, July 15, 2016

CrowdSourcing a Name – Don’t Google It

Sometimes Nougat Sticks in Your Teeth!

After the unimaginative Android Alpha and Android Beta, Google has historically named its Android updates after sweet products (or as Google calls them “sweet treats”). In compulsory alphabetical order we’ve had; Cupcake, Donut, Eclair, Froyo, Gingerbread, Honeycomb, Ice Cream Sandwich, Jelly Bean, KitKat, Lollipop and Marshmallow. When they arrived at Android N they took a different turn and asked the wider public to help name the product. As a PR stunt this has some appeal, as a naming strategy it seems to be at best a waste of time and at worst a bad idea (who can forget Boaty McBoatface?).

We had been lined up for Nougat, Neapolitan or maybe Nutella and were surprised when Google took the creatively bold step to crowd source the name. Apparently the decision was taken after the CEO told an Indian audience there was no reason it couldn’t be named after an Indian sweet. While they indicated on the webpage that they still wanted to follow the sweet treats theme, this did open up the possibility that they might decide to come up with something more imaginative.

So given that if the betting world had been bothered by this exercise, before the crowd sourcing the hot favourite for the new product name would have been Android Nougat, what did involving the great web public change? The short answer is nothing as Google has now announced the winning name as, you guessed it: Android Nougat! So everyone that contributed a more creative idea was indeed wasting their time as was whoever at Google came up with this idea and whoever sorted through what were likely thousands of entries.

One last thing: in the UK there is often confusion with the pronunciation of Nougat. Is it pronounced Noo-Gar or Nug-Gat? We don’t know if it has the same issues in other countries but will look forward to hearing how somebody from Google pronounces it.

Image: Google screenshot

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